michelle heshka

storyteller/photojournalism graduate

social issue: proving stereotypes wrong

A subject took me to a place in Belleville that she has a strong memory of. She took me to her elementary school. Little did she know that her school was being torn down to make room for a new one. It was an emotional discovery for her.




 



This is a comparison photo of last year and this year’s first assignment.
For those of you who don’t know, I am a second year Photojournalism student at Loyalist College. I am currently a freelance photojournalist in the Quinte area, as well as a portrait photographer.
Last year, my first class assignment was to find a stranger and take their photograph. This year, my first assignment was to shoot 5 strangers that belong to the same group. 
The photo on the left was taken last year and the photo on the right was taken this year.
I find it so interesting how my idea of a portrait has changed so much. In just a year, I’ve learned how to let people’s faces tell their own stories. I learned how to approach people and get closer to my subjects to allow for a more intimate moment, as well as a more intimate photo. I play with artificial and natural light and always focus on the eyes. 
I feel like my photos have developed a certain style, and I’m okay with that. I like airy, naturally lit photographs. I like to focus in with a wider aperture and get those little details on a person’s face.
As a photographer, it is my job to be a storyteller. Each portrait should show a piece of that person’s character and share something with the audience. I feel that slowly, my photographs are sharing more and more about my subjects.

This is a comparison photo of last year and this year’s first assignment.

For those of you who don’t know, I am a second year Photojournalism student at Loyalist College. I am currently a freelance photojournalist in the Quinte area, as well as a portrait photographer.

Last year, my first class assignment was to find a stranger and take their photograph. This year, my first assignment was to shoot 5 strangers that belong to the same group.

The photo on the left was taken last year and the photo on the right was taken this year.

I find it so interesting how my idea of a portrait has changed so much. In just a year, I’ve learned how to let people’s faces tell their own stories. I learned how to approach people and get closer to my subjects to allow for a more intimate moment, as well as a more intimate photo. I play with artificial and natural light and always focus on the eyes.

I feel like my photos have developed a certain style, and I’m okay with that. I like airy, naturally lit photographs. I like to focus in with a wider aperture and get those little details on a person’s face.

As a photographer, it is my job to be a storyteller. Each portrait should show a piece of that person’s character and share something with the audience. I feel that slowly, my photographs are sharing more and more about my subjects.

Jean-Marc Richard is a 56-year-old father and ex-DJ. After hurting his arm at work, he lost hope of finding a steady job, which sent him into a whirlwind of depression. While most homes are havens, his is a prison cell. His basement houses the thousands of records he is selling in attempt to provide for his family. Needless to say, the selling isn’t going well.  The very thought of continuing to sort though his enormous record collection sends Richard into a panic.

Being continually depressed from losing his job, he has lost all inspiration and motivation to move forward in life. The only motivation that remains is his daughter.

Richard says that his daughter is his reason for living and wants to provide a better life for her. “At the end of the day…its all about her.”

(Source: michelleheshka)